Wikipedia Post – Online Dating Profiles

After focusing so much on text messaging, I chose a different route with this assignment. Online dating is a way to find and build relationships on the internet with potential spouses. Wikipedia covers the topic of “Online Dating,” although they do not cover “Online Dating Profiles,” which I chose to research.

An online dating profile (ODP) is a profile that enables internet users or mobile phone carriers to upload personal information with the goal of meeting a potential suitor. Dating profiles are created via host sites, such as Match , eHarmony and Christian Mingle, that require users to join for a fee, prior to creating a profile. Only after a profile is created can users browse for desirable suitors. Dating profiles can be accessed by logging onto the internet or by downloading a corresponding mobile phone application on a smart phone .

Online dating  has been gaining recognition since 2002, when it first grew popular . Today, with over 800 matchmaking sites  to choose from, 40 million Americans have used an internet dating service. Of this 40 million, 20 million are members of eHarmony, while 15 million are members of Match , some of the most well-known dating sites.

The appeal of online dating is its convenience, exposing users to a large number of suitors. Since proximity is reduced with online dating, users are more likely to contact desirable mates because of a reduced sense of rejection. The sites also encourage elderly dating and enable users to work as his/her personal matchmaker.

Online daters range across all age demographics. For Match users, 25 percent are under age 30 while 26.5 percent are 50+.

Your Dating Profile
The purpose of a dating profile is to convey personality and lifestyle to potential suitors. Users “may be asked to reveal [their] age, sex, education, profession, number of children, religion, geographic location, sexual proclivities, drinking behavior, hobbies, income, ethnicity [and] drug use,” among other information. Each site varies in the amount of information requested from users, and it is held at the user’s discretion as to additional information provided and the accuracy of this information Many profiles enable users to write short blurbs about themselves, which is where personality is communicated further. Users are typically required to upload a recent photograph(s) to identify their profile.

The information provided on profiles, along with site-specific surveys, enable dating sites to match users with a list of potential suitors. Some dating sites require extensive questionnaires, such as eHarmony’s 400-question survey , while other sites require a simple set of questions.

A dating profile is accessible to all users within a host site. If a user wishes to create a profile on multiple host sites, he/she will pay separate fees for each site. A dating profile is only visible to users that chose the same host site and will be unreachable to internet users outside of this spectrum. Profile holders can search dating sites for specific characteristics and may choose to contact an individual based on their characteristics. The profile functions as a screening sheet for the qualities an individual possesses, enabling users to decide whether or not to contact someone based on information provided.

False Information
Information accuracy is vital with online dating, since the goal is to meet a compatible mate. Providing inaccurate information, such as outdated photographs or false occupational history, will paint an artificial picture to users. Although dating sites use various techniques to screen users, no singular method is sufficient in filtering fake profiles.

Online dating profiles enable users to personally determine which information is made public. Therefore, users can manipulate self-disclosure, which is defined as “any message about the self that an individual shares with another.” In attempts to be portrayed in a positive light, many users hide otherwise important information (losing a job, illegitimate children, drug/alcohol history, divorce, illness).  At least 20 percent of online daters admit to deception , and the Pew Research Center & American Life Project found that 52 percent of online daters specifically report that users lie about their relationship status.

Since users are required to upload a recent photograph(s), images on matchmaking sites can also be altered. Perceived flaws such as short height for men or weight gain for women are often concealed.

Defamation to Character
All information exchanged via the internet can be shared, rediscovered and exchanged between large numbers of people. Any negative information could be detrimental to a user’s career, future relationships and overall persona. In order to avoid defamation, all public [and even private] information must be filtered and approved by the user. Exchanging risqué photographs and/or information with potential suitors, private or public, can be shared via the internet.

The Pew Research Center American Life Project  found that 66 percent of internet users find that “online dating is a dangerous activity because it puts personal information on the internet.” According to project, the users most at risk are female users, elderly users, and users with low-income levels.

References
www.match.com
www.eharmony.com
www.christianmingle.com

Austin-Oden, Deena, Aimee E. King, and Jeffrey M. Lohr. “Browsing for love in all the wrong places: does research show that Internet matchmaking is more successful than traditional dating?” Skeptic [Altadena, CA] 15.1 (2009): 48+. Academic OneFile. Web. 24 June 2013.

Bowen, Justin. “Match.com Is a Perfect Example of the Surprising Statistics of Online Dating Site Subscribers.” Http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/7/prweb9746924.htm. PR Web, 29 July 2012. Web. 21 June 2013.

Madden, Mary, and Amanda Lenhart. “Online Dating.” Pew Research Center, 5 Mar. 2006. Web. 21 June 2013. <http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2006/Online-Dating/01-Summary-of-Findings.aspxv>.

“The Perils and Pitfalls of Online Dating: How to Protect Yourself.” Privacy Rights Clearinghouse. N.p., May 2013. Web. 21 June 2013. <https://www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs37-online-dating.htm#personal-information>




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5 comments
  1. Kanthala Raghu said:

    i’d want you to to join my site , your writings are amazing what do u say ? will be waiting to hear from you !

  2. Escapist Theory, this post was my JAM! Hahaha. I’m very familiar with online dating and have experienced positive and negative relationships as a result. I noted below that not all dating sites require a fee. POF is one of them (Plenty of Fish). Like many things in life, you kind of get what you pay for. There’s a lot of losers on POF simply because it’s free – and from my experience most just want to hook-up. Another thing to note is that dating sites work best in urban communities. In rural places, everyone knows each other and online dating is pointless. The stats were interesting to read about. My biggest suggestion would be to cite properly using the MLA technique, which is what wiki uses. Great stuff. Love to read your work.

    After focusing so much on text messaging, I chose a different route with this assignment. Online dating is a way to find and build relationships on the internet with potential spouses. Wikipedia covers the topic of “Online Dating,” although they do not cover “Online Dating Profiles,” which I chose to research.

    An online dating profile (ODP) is a profile that enables internet users or mobile phone carriers to upload personal information with the goal of meeting a potential suitor (NICE). Dating profiles are created via host sites, such as Match , eHarmony and Christian Mingle, that require users to join for a fee, prior to creating a profile. (Please note that some online dating sites are free of charge) Only after a profile is created can users browse for desirable suitors. Dating profiles can be accessed by logging onto the internet or by downloading a corresponding mobile phone application on a smart phone .

    Online dating has been gaining recognition since 2002, when it first grew popular . Today, with over 800 matchmaking sites to choose from, 40 million Americans have used an internet dating service. Of this 40 million, 20 million are members of eHarmony, while 15 million are members of Match , (end sentence here and begin with something like, “These are the two most popular online dating sites.”) some of the most well-known dating sites.

    The appeal of online dating is its convenience, [exposing] (to expose) users to a large number of suitors. Since proximity is reduced with online dating, users are more likely to contact desirable mates because of a reduced sense of rejection. [The sites also encourage elderly dating and] (There is a site out there for every demographic, young and old, that) enable users to [work as his/her] (be their own) personal matchmaker.

    [Online daters range across all age demographics.] For Match users, 25 percent are under age 30 while 26.5 percent are 50+.

    Your Dating Profile
    The purpose of a dating profile is to convey personality and lifestyle to potential suitors. Users “may be asked to reveal [their] age, sex, education, profession, number of children, religion, geographic location, sexual proclivities, drinking behavior, hobbies, income, ethnicity [and] drug use,” (cite needed here) among other information. Each site varies in the amount of information requested from users, and it is [held at] (at) the user’s discretion [as to] (to provide) additional information [provided and the accuracy of this information] (The accuracy of the info provided is questionable at best) Many profiles enable users to write short blurbs about themselves, (end sentence here and start with something like, “This gives them a chance to showcase their personality”) which is where personality is communicated further. Users are typically required to upload a [recent] photograph(s) to [identify] their profile.

    The information provided on profiles, along with site-specific surveys, enable dating sites to match users with a list of potential suitors. Some dating sites require extensive questionnaires, (end sentence here and start with eHarmony’s consists of 400 questions) such as eHarmony’s 400-question survey , while other sites require a simple set of questions.

    A dating profile is accessible to all users within a host site. If a user wishes to create a profile on multiple host sites, he/she will [pay separate fees for each site] (be responsible for any fees associated). [A dating profile] (Once a profile is created, it) is only visible to [users that chose the same host] (others that have joined the same) site (end sentence here and start the next with something like, “Those who have not signed up will be unable to access your profile.”) and will be unreachable to internet users outside of this spectrum. Profile holders can search dating sites for specific characteristics and may choose to contact an individual based on [their characteristics] (them). The profile functions as a screening [sheet] (process) for the qualities an individual possesses, (end sentence here and start the next one with “This enables the users”) enabling users to decide whether or not to contact someone based on information provided.

    False Information
    Information accuracy is vital with online dating, since the goal is to meet a compatible mate. (I would switch this sentence around to start with the goal) Providing inaccurate information, such as outdated photographs or false occupational history, will paint an artificial picture to users. (you may want to note that without doing a background check, many people never know) Although dating sites use various techniques to screen users, no singular method is sufficient in filtering fake profiles.

    Online dating profiles enable users to personally determine which information is made public. Therefore, users can manipulate self-disclosure, which is defined as “any message about the self that an individual shares with another.” (cite needed here) In attempts to be portrayed in a positive light, many users hide otherwise important information (losing a job, illegitimate children, drug/alcohol history, divorce, illness). At least 20 percent of online daters admit to deception , and the Pew Research Center & American Life Project found that 52 percent of online daters specifically report that users lie about their relationship status.

    Since users are [required] (asked) to upload a recent photograph(s), images on [matchmaking] (these) sites can [also] (easily) be altered. [Perceived] flaws such as [short] height [for men] or weight gain [for women] are often concealed.

    Defamation to Character
    All information exchanged via the internet can be shared, rediscovered and exchanged between large numbers of people. Any negative information could be detrimental to a user’s career, future relationships and overall [persona] (life). In order to avoid defamation, all public [and even private] information must be filtered and approved by the user. Exchanging risqué photographs [and/]or information with potential suitors, private or public, can be shared [via the internet] (by any number of online players).

    The Pew Research Center American Life Project found that 66 percent of internet users [find that] (think) “online dating is a dangerous activity because it puts personal information on the internet.” According to project, the users most at risk are female [users], elderly [users, and] (or) users with low-income [levels].

    References
    http://www.match.com
    http://www.eharmony.com
    http://www.christianmingle.com

    Austin-Oden, Deena, Aimee E. King, and Jeffrey M. Lohr. “Browsing for love in all the wrong places: does research show that Internet matchmaking is more successful than traditional dating?” Skeptic [Altadena, CA] 15.1 (2009): 48+. Academic OneFile. Web. 24 June 2013.

    Bowen, Justin. “Match.com Is a Perfect Example of the Surprising Statistics of Online Dating Site Subscribers.” http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/7/prweb9746924.htm. PR Web, 29 July 2012. Web. 21 June 2013.

    Madden, Mary, and Amanda Lenhart. “Online Dating.” Pew Research Center, 5 Mar. 2006. Web. 21 June 2013. .

    “The Perils and Pitfalls of Online Dating: How to Protect Yourself.” Privacy Rights Clearinghouse. N.p., May 2013. Web. 21 June 2013.

    • I’m glad you liked the post! I’ve never personally used dating sites but I’ve had many friends who experimented. I’m also really interested in the topic so I’ve seen the Dateline-style documentaries on the “hazards” of online dating. It’s funny that you mention POF because (from hearing feedback from friends) I’ve been thinking of trying it! But I guess it’s not the best direction to head down.

      And that’s another interesting idea for a post – online dating in rural vs. urban areas. I’ve never even thought about this before, coming from the suburbs on the outskirts of urban New York City, but it makes sense. Why would people join dating websites when everyone knows everyone anyways? What can these people do to meet people in their areas? Interesting discussion.

      I had difficulties with the citation, but I will use MLA in my rewrite. Thanks for the feedback, as always!

  3. Absolutely! And don’t be hindered by my interpretation of POF – I definitely met some fun peeps out of the deal that I still keep in touch with. Some ppl (like myself) simply refuse to pay $$ to find a date. But with everything in life there are downsides to this as well. I think you should try it first – then decide if it’s for you or not.

    Glad you picked up on that concept too because it began to interest me last semester.

    • It’s really interesting. Just to think of the interactions played between these websites. I have mixed emotions about dating services and I hear all sorts of stories, so I’m never sure of what to think. And, of course, the initial “What if someone I know sees me on this website?” concern needs to cease. But, I’m thinking about it. May consider trying out POF, just to see what it’s like.

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