Texting Can Improve Our Social Interaction

* I’ve always believed that text messaging erases the connection between people that can only occur with physical communication. Placing a cell phone between two people not only gives them unusual convenience when interacting, but it enables them to manipulate their interactions. My original argument for this piece would be that texting hinders social communication by allowing people to focus more on themselves than others. However, the reverse argument suggests that texting is beneficial because it allows us to set aside conversations and continue on with our personal lives.*

There’s no better tool to accompany the introvert than a smart phone. With their text messaging device in hand and an eye for avoiding phone calls, the introvert is keen at socializing through this pocket pal. After all, that’s nearly 50 percent of us, fully equipped with a socializing machine that doesn’t interrupt our personal lives.

If we ask one another why we prefer texting, the typical reply is, “Because, it’s easier.” And, it is. Unlike everyone else, these introverts benefit from avoiding unwanted phone calls by sending quick texts instead. Ok. Got it. Cya. If you’re looking to end a relationship, save the sobbing and send a text: “We r done.” If your mom asks you to make a pit stop for milk, just reply, “No.” If your girlfriend wants to come over and “talk” about her job, just type, “Can’t. Busy.” Enter those few words, and you’re golden. A superfluous conversation will never happen again.

For us introverts, this means that dodging the doorbell or wearing large sunglasses is no longer needed to secure our personal time. If your loved ones need you, they know that a text will find you.

Teenagers, introverts from strict parents, though not by choice, have already jumped on the bandwagon. According to the Pew Research Center, 72 percent of teens text every day, with one-third sending more than 100 texts daily. Parents support texting because despite the silent dinner table, their child is behaving rather than roaming the streets. Instead of hogging the house phone, grandma can call while little Jimmy sits in his room, silent. A whole generation of quiet, pleasant teenagers: what a revolution.

If we consider all the ways texting can improve our social skills, the list is endless. Never again is an embarrassing public argument needed. Simply quit the bickering, walk away, and text your friend from a distance. Instead of telling your brother he upset you, just ignore his texts. The world would be a much calmer, orderly place if we only followed these suggestions.

As human beings, by nature we have problems communicating. With all the colorful personalities in the world, it’s impossible to fully understand everyone, every day, at every moment. We may grow irritated, nervous or upset when a conversation goes sour. Why not avoid this discomfort by wedging a phone between you and your pal?

For us introverts and regulated teenagers, texting provides an avenue to get to know others. Wikihow.com suggests asking open-ended questions that illicit longer a reply. Specifically the site says, don’t ask yes or no questions, such as, “Do you like pop music?” but instead ask, “What are your favorite genres of music? ” A momentous conversation, like this, can spark without requiring you to leave the couch, finish a painting or exit the tanning bed – and most importantly, not intrude on “me” time.

Texting is a tool that can improve our social skills, as a nation. Rather than have lunch with a friend, save yourself the cash and gas by texting them for an hour. If you’re overcome with nostalgia, ask them to send a picture message. The conversation will seem just like the person is physically there with you. Especially ground-breaking for nervous parents, avoid the “birds and bees” conversation by texting your children instead. Even include a link or two to informative websites or info-graphics. You’ll grow closer to them by the minute.

Texting isn’t just for introverts or teens anymore. As a nation, if we’d only just text more and talk less, communication would be far more efficient, practical and enjoyable.

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6 comments
  1. Strange. My brother upset me the other day by not telling me he got a job and instead of confronting him about it I ignored his texts. We are a texting generation. I remember when I first discovered texting. It was like a whole new world of communication opened up and I suddenly became much more concerned with my cell phone than I ever had before. You made great points about how texting has given us different avenues of communciation and has changed how we communicate. I enjoyed being able to relate to your words.

    I wish you had established yourself as an introvert in a stronger way. Starting the piece off with a statement like “I am an introvert and texting has changed my life” would have given me a solid picture of why you were writing the piece and that you were writing it from experience. This may have also changed the feel of most of the piece, but I think it would make it that much stronger. Talk from the first person. Tell me about your experiences, and how texting has helped you satisfy your need to be an introvert. Or, if you’re looking to make it more like editorial about texting, keep yourself completely out of it so that the piece becomes neutral – so we see you as simply an outsider.

    Your statements are strong, just make sure you decide what perspective you are writing from.

    • I should have began the argument in a different manner. I just included a paragraph at the top stating how this was my reversal argument. I actually believe that introverts, and all of us, really, shouldn’t resort to texting when communicating. I feel it functions as a wall between forming substantial human relationships. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had serious conversations over text messaging, that should have been done in person. The reality of this revolution is just ridiculous.

      I agree with your suggestion about the introvert. I guess the reader is somewhat left in the dark about who’s an introvert and why I was saying something like that. I struggle with writing between the perspectives of first person or third person. Although there is certainly a balance between the two, I don’t want the reader to think I’m only speaking about myself as the know-it-all guru of text messaging and social media. I guess this is something I’ll have to figure out a balance between. But thank you for the input!

  2. Hi Escapist Theory,
    I agree with Amateur Yogi in establishing yourself as an introvert from the get-go as well as making a decision on perspective. I enjoyed watching you play the devil’s advocate with this piece. I found it hard to look at my ‘voice’ from the other side. This was a fun journey and you made some well-written points! To avoid redundance, I’ve started my critique on this post with the fourth paragraph. I tried critiquing in a different manor, but ended up going back to the brackets and parenthesis b/c it’s easier for me. If you have any questions let me know. This was a fun journey to take with you!

    Awkward pp: “Teenagers, introverts from strict parents, though not by choice, have already jumped on the bandwagon.” Try rearranging the paragraph to something like this: ‘According to the Pew Research Center, 72 percent of teens text every day, with one-third sending more than 100 texts daily.Parents, especially strict parents, support and (encourage/prefer) texting with their teens despite the silent dinner table. Their child is now behaving, rather than roaming the streets.Grandma can now get through seamlessly on the landline while little Jimmy sits in his room, silent. A whole generation of quiet, pleasant teenagers: what a revolution.’ **I like the way this paragraph ends. BAM! Point driven home!

    Instead of: “If we consider all the ways texting can improve our social skills, the list is endless.” Try this: ‘There are countless ways texting improves social skills.’

    **Back to regular critiquing style below**

    [Never again is an embarrassing public argument needed] (Public embarrassment from arguing will cease by) [Simply quit the bickering, walk] (walking) away, [and text] (while texting) your friend from a distance. Instead of telling your brother he upset you, [just] ignore his texts. The world would be a much calmer, orderly place if [we only followed] these suggestions were followed.

    [As human beings,] by nature we have problems communicating. With all (of) the colorful personalities in the world, it’s impossible to fully understand everyone, every day, at every moment. We [may] grow irritated, nervous or upset when a conversation goes sour. Why not avoid this discomfort by wedging a phone between you and your pal? *Another great ending!

    For [us] introverts and [regulated teenagers] (teens alike), texting provides an avenue to get to know others. Wikihow.com suggests asking open-ended questions that illicit longer a reply. Specifically the site says, don’t ask yes or no questions, such as, “Do you like pop music?” but instead ask, “What are your favorite genres of music? ” A momentous conversation, like this, can spark without requiring you to leave the couch, finish a painting or exit the tanning bed – and most importantly, not intrude on “me” time. *I like that you introduced research here to back up texting while playing the devil’s advocate, but I feel like this point may contradict the point you make in the second paragraph.

    Texting is a tool that can improve our social skills, [as a nation] (on a national level). [Rather than have lunch with a friend,] save yourself [the] cash and gas (money for lunch) by texting [them] (a friend) for an hour. [If you’re overcome with nostalgia, ask them to send a] picture message(s and skyping can be fun options to include with texts). The conversation will seem just like the person is physically there with you. [Especially ground-breaking for nervous] (Parents can now avoid the “birds and bees” conversation by texting their children instead of risking anxiety over the subject matter. By including a link or two of informative websites or info-graphics, they will grow closer to their kids by the minute.)
    *I think these last two sentences would serve better at the bottom of the second paragraph before the final sentence, “Enter those few words, and your golden”*

    Texting isn’t just for introverts or teens anymore. [As a nation, if we’d only] (If our nation would) [just] text more and talk less, communication would be far more efficient, practical and enjoyable.
    **GREAT ENDING**

  3. Thank for so much for the extensive feedback. I agree with your changes to the original piece, and I like that you provided me with different ways to write certain sentences. Sometimes I stumble over my words and include either too much or too little, but I’m glad you suggested ways to improve this. Thank you very much! I found it difficult to argue the other side for this assignment, since I truly feel that texting hinders communication, but I did my best!

  4. I had a difficult time with mine too! It’s so hard to argue for the ‘other’ team when you feel so strongly about your beliefs 🙂

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